NaNoWriMo: The Biggest Writing Event in the World

nanowrimo 2008

NaNoWriMo: The biggest writing event in the world.

The time has come. At midnight tonight, tens of thousands of writers will embark on a challenge like no other — a writer’s marathon if ever there was one — each working to complete a 50,000-word novel is just thirty days.

That’s quite a feat!

Last year, over one hundred thousand people participated in NaNoWriMo (short for National Novel Writing Month), and this year the folks at the Office of Letters and Light (that’s Nano’s headquarters) have raised over $160,000 to keep NaNoWriMo free and available to writers all around the globe.

In fact, for our friends in other parts of the world, like Australia and New Zealand, NaNoWriMo is already underway. Are you ready to get in on the action? Can you handle a writing exercise that’s this big?

In Fact, It’s the Biggest Writing Exercise Ever!




If this event, which is probably the biggest writing exercise in history, appeals to the novelist in you, then head over to nanowrimo.org and sign up.

You’ll get access to the forums, NaNo mail, and you’ll benefit from the support system with writing buddies who are also participating. Visit Procrastination Station whenever your muse goes into hiding.  Subscribe to the official blog, and keep track of your word count using the handy dandy online widget.

Happy Noveling everyone, and Happy Halloween too!

About Melissa Donovan

Melissa Donovan is a website designer and copywriter. She writes fiction and poetry and is the founder and editor of Writing Forward, a blog packed with creative writing tips and ideas.

Comments

10 Responses to “NaNoWriMo: The Biggest Writing Event in the World”

  1. Writer Dad says:

    Hey, that’s true! NaNoWriMo’s already going in other parts of the world. I’m super excited/nervous. Not that I can’t do it, just that I won’t do anything else. Good luck tomorrow!

  2. @Writer Dad, I’m nervous too! It’s such an enormous endeavor. I’m planning on getting started right at midnight (the witching hour). Muahahaha.

  3. Deb says:

    HI, I’m excited this year. I do remember last year though pacing the floor wondering if I would even be able to write the first sentence. This year there is so much chaos in my life I have not had time to think let alone panic about November.

    See you on the boards!

  4. Brad says:

    Hi Melissa! Good luck this year! I hope you’re able to get that novel written without too much stress. I’m not participating this year but I’m sending good vibes to everyone that is!

  5. Friar says:

    Aww…I feel left out. I’m in the minority here. Everyone in the Blogosphere is talking about NaNoWriMo.

    But I’m going to pass.

    I need to work on my story book.

    (And very few kids’ books are 50,000 words!)

  6. @Deb, I’m excited too. I was sort of nervous but now that I’ve got my first 972 words, I’m feeling a lot better about it.

    @Brad, Thanks! It is a little stressful because this first week I’m also busy with other projects but then I should have a little more time and get adjusted enough to be relaxed about it. I appreciate your good vibes.

    @Friar, There’s always next year! Your storybook is coming along nicely, so I think sticking to that is a smart move.

  7. Marelisa says:

    Best of luck Melissa! I thought of entering but I have too much on my plate right now. I’ll be rooting for you 🙂

  8. @Marelisa, Thanks so much! I’ll post some updates here throughout the month. Any rooting is much appreciated!

  9. Cath Lawson says:

    Hi Melissa – I’d heard about this but I’m not entering. The only thing I’m wondering is – Is there a prize for the winner? If so, how do they know folk didn’t begin writing before the one month deadline?

  10. @Cath, The NaNo prize is a 50k-word novel. The whole idea has more to with accomplishing a goal than winning an actual prize. It’s also based on the honor system. People could, theoretically, start before November 1st, or even lie about how many words they actually wrote, but those people would know in their hearts that they did not win.